Juried Art Show, Highland Art Cent

Sunday, October 2, 2016 11:10 PM Edited: Monday, October 3, 2016 9:45 PM

    32nd Annual Juried Art Show, October 1, 2016 from the Snyder/Highland Art Center

  (Pictured is the Best In Show metal sculpture and the metal duck sculpture.)

32nd annual Juried Art Show at the Highland Art Center yielded truly exceptional art in all categories. To create this exciting exhibit, member artists submitted the best of their work in hopes that they would fare well against their counterparts. Then the guest juror selected the pieces that are displayed in the show with awards for his favorites in each category as well as an overall Best in Show grand prize.  A “People’s Choice Award will be determined.

The Snyder/Highland Art Center chooses a different juror every year based on their artistic and academic careers in the Arts. This year they are pleased to announce that the distinguished juror is David Gentry, art instructor at Shasta College in Redding CA. Gentry earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in sculpture from the University of Illinois, and a Masters of Fine Arts in glass and sculpture from the California College of Art in Oakland. In the Bay Area, he worked with internationally renowned ceramicist Peter Voulkos. From 1999 to 2001, Gentry also worked as a professional sculptor with an artists’ consortium called the Northwest Mystics at a fine art foundry in the Olympic Rainforest on the Quimper Peninsula along the coast of Washington state.

The show will be on display through October 31st during normal business hours Tues-Sat 11am-5pm. For more information contact the Highland Art Center at 530-623-5111.

RESULTS of the Awards:

Best In Show; Pat Harger’s Saber Tooth Terminator was undeniably the clear winner though he loved the purity and metal handling and finish of Blade the Duck, who did receive an Award of Excellence.

             

            (Sculptor Pat Harger with Highland director, Shanna Franceschini)

Watercolor division Award of Excellence went to Olive Schroeder of Coffee Creek.  Gentry loved the purity of the painting with an Asian feeling.

Maria Cargill’s pastel is a stunning piece, rich color and expert handling of the medium.                                      

Gentry noted that the matting and framing nicely suit the piece.  He cautioned the audience that Garish or Cheap framing will often cause a nice piece to be disqualified.  Signatures on an angle are distracting and can lead the eye out of the work and can eliminate a piece from tough competition.

   

Roberta Stone still life in graphite, Tin Cups and the White Hawk in acrylic both received Outstanding Achievement Awards, appreciating Roberta’s use of blue in the beak.

Cindy Dunn’s multi-media piece, Night Vision, reminded Gentry of the Dada Movement and collagist Hans Arp.  He appreciated the balance, color and shape, pure design of the piece.

                

Susan Alexander’s drawing received Outstanding Achievement with a piece that is a cross between Asian/Indian and Peter Max paintings.

                                  (Judge David Gentry, left, extolling the virtues of the ceramic piece by Dan Molyneux.)

Dan Molyneux’s White/Gold Ewer  received an Outstanding Achievement Award.  It is reminiscent of Richard Shaw of the Northern Clay Center, Berkeley, California.

Betty Pestoni’s painting received Honorable Mention and represented an exception to the rule of “Never sign a painting on an angle” in which her signature is painted in the style of the art so works.

Keiki Yamasaki received an honorable mention for his ceramic Clawflower sculpture.  Gentry was very impressed when Keiki explained that he built it all from slabs instead of throwing the base.  A graphite drawing entitled Ghost Pines by Olive Schroder received an honorable mention in the drawing category as well.  Lastly, Lynda Nolte's 'She's a Rebel' received an honorable mention in the painting category, but because she wasn't in attendance Gentry didn't discuss the painting.  

Drop into the Highland Art Center to see all of the stunning and imaginative artwork in this exhibit.